Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics
© Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics
Reducing Prescription Drug Abuse

NEWS BITES

CDC Issues New Opioid Prescribing

Guidelines

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has published opioid prescribing guidelines in response to more than 40 deaths per day from pain killer use in the United States. What has been termed by the federal agency as an epidemic, the CDC is pushing for tamper-resistant forms of pain killers combined with alternative treatments and enhanced prescription monitoring programs. This marks the first time the federal government has issued clear recommendations for the use of opioid pain killers. For more information click here.

HB 1948 Directly Impacts Dr. Shopping

The passage of HB 1948 appears to have sharply decreased the ability of doctor shoppers to get controlled drugs illegally. Passed in May of 2015, the new law went into effect on November 1st. Requiring all physicians to check the PMP every six months for patients who get pain killers or benzodiazepines like Xanax and the muscle relaxer Soma, the law started making an impact even before it went into effect. In addition, the bill will remove about 5 million opioid pain killers from the distribution chain in 2016. This bill combined with increased access to naloxone, updated prescribing guidelines, new research and additional programs from the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics, the Oklahoma Department of Health, the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services and the Oklahoma Healthcare Authority is expeced to furhter decrease the harmful effects of abused controlled drugs.

Emergence of Synthetic Fentanyl

The illicit use of Synthetic Fentanyl, a powerful opioid, has skyrocketed around the world resulting in addiction and death. Commonly referred to as “China White”, fentanyl is replacing heroine as the traditional drug of choice for abuse. While many European countries are struggling to combat the drug, the hardest hit areas include Estonia, Norway, Ireland and the United Kingdom. In the last year, the United States has experienced sharp increases where fentanyl is mixed with other street drugs, including heroine. The city of New Orleans reports that more than half of all opioid related deaths are a result of fentanyl abuse. Other areas of the country that are effected are the East Coast and New England. The same sources that provide illegal access to this powerful narcotic are also beleived to be responsible for other deadly drugs, including Spice and K2. According to the DEA, most illicit fentanyl is smuggled in from Mexico to distribution hubs in Atlanta and Houston. Fentanyl is significantly cheaper to produce than heroine. For further information click here.

Obama Administration Expands Efforts to Combat Opioid Drug Abuse

In March, President Obama announced additionalefforts to address prescription drug abuse. The expanded program provides 1.1 billion in funding to expand treatment, establish a national task force, improve mental health care for Medicaid participants, expand the use of naloxine to reverse the effects of opioid overdoses, increase community invovlment for reducing addiction and implementing syringe services to fight the spread of related health hazards. For the first time, the program has enlisted the help of America’s medical colleges to provide courses in the prescribing of opioid drugs. For more information click here.
OBNDDC
© Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics PMP System
Reducing Prescription Drug Abuse

NEWS BITES

CDC Issues New Opioid Prescribing

Guidelines

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has published opioid prescribing guidelines in response to more than 40 deaths per day from pain killer use in the United States. What has been termed by the federal agency as an epidemic, the CDC is pushing for tamper-resistant forms of pain killers combined with alternative treatments and enhanced prescription monitoring programs. This marks the first time the federal government has issued clear recommendations for the use of opioid pain killers. For more information click here.

HB 1948 Directly Impacts Dr.

Shopping

The passage of HB 1948 appears to have sharply decreased the ability of doctor shoppers to get controlled drugs illegally. Passed in May of 2015, the new law went into effect on November 1st. Requiring all physicians to check the PMP every six months for patients who get pain killers or benzodiazepines like Xanax and the muscle relaxer Soma, the law started making an impact even before it went into effect. In addition, the bill will remove about 5 million opioid pain killers from the distribution chain in 2016. This bill combined with increased access to naloxone, updated prescribing guidelines, new research and additional programs from the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics, the Oklahoma Department of Health, the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services and the Oklahoma Healthcare Authority is expeced to furhter decrease the harmful effects of abused controlled drugs.

Emergence of Synthetic Fentanyl

The illicit use of Synthetic Fentanyl, a powerful opioid, has skyrocketed around the world resulting in addiction and death. Commonly referred to as “China White”, fentanyl is replacing heroine as the traditional drug of choice for abuse. While many European countries are struggling to combat the drug, the hardest hit areas include Estonia, Norway, Ireland and the United Kingdom. In the last year, the United States has experienced sharp increases where fentanyl is mixed with other street drugs, including heroine. The city of New Orleans reports that more than half of all opioid related deaths are a result of fentanyl abuse. Other areas of the country that are effected are the East Coast and New England. The same sources that provide illegal access to this powerful narcotic are also beleived to be responsible for other deadly drugs, including Spice and K2. According to the DEA, most illicit fentanyl is smuggled in from Mexico to distribution hubs in Atlanta and Houston. Fentanyl is significantly cheaper to produce than heroine. For further information click here.

Obama Administration Expands

Efforts to Combat Opioid Drug

Abuse

In March, President Obama announced additionalefforts to address prescription drug abuse. The expanded program provides 1.1 billion in funding to expand treatment, establish a national task force, improve mental health care for Medicaid participants, expand the use of naloxine to reverse the effects of opioid overdoses, increase community invovlment for reducing addiction and implementing syringe services to fight the spread of related health hazards. For the first time, the program has enlisted the help of America’s medical colleges to provide courses in the prescribing of opioid drugs. For more information click here.